Serving Kerr County with a Conscience
Pvt water well meters

Taxpayers Take Note!

Taxpayers Take Note!
You may soon be asked to pay for the cost of collecting data when developers are drilling privately owned permitted “public” wells in Kerr County.  The term “public” just means that the well extends into the Trinity Aquifers.   Up to now, the developer of the public well has paid for the data logging equipment usage and a geologists time to collect the data and submit it to the Headwaters Groundwater Conservation Board.  Costs can range from $4000 to $6000.  I believe both conservative and more liberal thinking citizens can agree that the developer, who will obviously benefit the most from a successful project, should pay for the data collection.  Developers pay for other costs including streets, sewer, curb, park space, etc. that they recover from those who buy into or rent portions of their development. 
 
Kerr County has one of the outstanding hydrogeological pictures of the aquifers and well water supplies of any county in Texas.  HGCD has monitor wells in place paid for by taxpayer funds.  They are monitoring several privately owned wells with the cooperation of well owners.  The water in our deep aquifers may take 2000 years to recharge.  We may now be in a 30 year drought cycle.  Good science can help us manage our water supply.  Present and new water users will pay to keep good data collection science in ongoing.  Let’s  have the developers pay to collect the data for new wells coming on line.
 
Mark your calendars for October 19(Hearing on Rescinding Rule 8.5) and November 9th(the HGCD Board will vote to Rescind Rule 8.5)  I know that about 75% of the voters in Kerr County tend be conservative voters and desire to keep the individualistic entrepreneurial spirit alive.  Now is the time to attend the above meetings and let the HGCD Board of Directors know that developers should pay their own way.  If a $5000 data collection cost related to developing a $100,000 to $250,000 “public” well would nix a developer’s project then the developer should review the business plan.  Spread over a 100 home project the cost is $50 per home.  These seemingly minor costs passed to the taxpayer can result over time in less money available for your children and grandchildren’s education.  Education in Texas is a better investment right now than providing more financial incentives to developers.
 
Gary C. McVey, Former Prec. 1 Director, HGCD 
0 Comments